Film

Wonder Woman, The Movie

If you loved Superman, The Movie (1978), then you are going to love Wonder Woman.

Wonder Woman focuses on the horrors of war, the value of friendship and comic book heroism. The film tells Wonder Woman’s story before she was Wonder Woman — when she was Diana, Amazonian princess and warrior in training. One day, after a fierce training session, a handsome pilot named Steve Trevor crashes off the shores of her hidden homeland of Themyscira and tells of a conflict in the outside world.  Diana leaves to fight a “war to end all wars” (then known as The Great War or to us, World War I), discovering her full powers and ultimately her destiny.

Like the film that launched the superhero blockbuster nearly forty years ago, Wonder Woman sets a new standard, most notably with regards to how timely it is. When Wonder Woman is challenged with propaganda about war, her eyes see the truth in the faces of the wounded soldiers and civilian casualties. She’s horrified by the generals who simply stand back with no consideration for the loss of life. Echoes of Syria can be felt in this film where helping people in need should be placed above religion, race or politics—something Wonder Woman conveys several times in the film. The humanity this fictional character demonstrates stands in complete contrast to the draft dodging, xenophobic “reality” show tangerine Mussolini currently in the White House. As Arris Quinones of Variant Comics noted, “…it is just really an inspiring movie. It actually made me want to go out and do good in the world.” Not surprisingly, the snowflakes at Fox “News” and the New York Post belly-ached at how Wonder Woman’s costume no longer looked “patriotic.” It should be noted that the costume still has many of the recognizable symbols, but largely draws inspiration from the mythical armor that the Amazons have been wearing for centuries (which, like democracy, has roots in Greco-Roman culture). Wonder Woman’s lasso of truth is a breath of fresh air in this time of alternative facts and fake news.

Director Patty Jenkins does a remarkable job bringing the world of Wonder Woman to life. Most notable is the depiction of the Amazons: it was truly page to screen! If you look closely, some of the Amazons were wearing elements seen in different versions of Wonder Woman’s costume.

 

Gal Gadot, as I noted last year in my review for Batman v. Superman, is nothing short of wonderful. The supporting characters all stand out with kudos to Chris Pine’s portrayal of Steve Trevor. I am looking forward to seeing the Amazons in action in the forthcoming Justice League film.

Wonder Woman should have been made a long time ago, but this film is one that was worth waiting for. It is truly worth seeing, not only because it was directed by a woman and stars a woman, but because it is the best superhero film DC has produced since the Dark Knight trilogy. Like Superman, The Movie and the Dark Knight films, this one will age really well and become a metric for superhero films.

Wonder Woman, 2017.

Directed by Patty Jenkins.

Starring Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Connie Nielsen, Robin Wright, David Thewlis, Danny Huston, Elena Anaya, Ewan Bremner, Lucy Davis, Eugene Brave Rock, Emily Carey, Lilly Aspell, and Saïd Taghmaoui.

RECOMMENDED VIDEOS

The History of Wonder Woman

 

Wonder Woman’s Strongest Moments

 

The Origin of Ares

 

READING RECOMMENDATIONS

 

DC has a miniseries about the Amazons, years before the birth of Diana (Wonder Woman), titled The Odyssey of the Amazons. It is the story of a group of Amazons who are traveling the ancient world to find others like them, encountering legendary creatures and beings along the way. An excellent companion would be Wonder Woman Rebirth #8. It is a year one interlude where a young Barbara Ann Minerva (before she was Cheetah and before Wonder Woman arrives) is on an exhibition to prove that the Amazons did indeed exist (an excellent story).

 

What I wore to see the film.

What I wore to see the film.

The cast of Julieta.

Film Review: Almodóvar’s “Julieta”

Julieta is Pedro Almodóvar’s twentieth film and joins the pantheon of his best works. It was inspired by three short stories from the book by Alice Munro, Runaway, as well as the female-centric films of the 1940’s with hints of Hitchcock as well as Almodóvar’s own earlier works, most notably, his masterpiece, All About My Mother. One might even consider Julieta to be the 21st century All About My Mother.

The film traces three decades of the title character’s life. It starts with a middle-aged Julieta living in Madrid, with her boyfriend Lorenzo, and they are planning to move to Portugal. One day she runs into Bea, former best friend of her daughter Antia, who reveals that Antia, whom Julieta has not seen or spoken with in twelve years, is living in Switzerland and is married with three children. Julieta abruptly cancels the move, breaks up with Lorenzo, and moves to her former building, hoping that Antia someday communicates with her. Julieta, alone with her thoughts, starts to write her memories and her story is told in a series of flashbacks.

One of the most interesting things about Julieta is the double casting: Julieta in her twenties and early thirties is played by Adriana Ugarte, while in middle age is played by Emma Suárez. We witness what heartache and time can do to a person through Emma Suárez. Both actresses did amazing work, but I don’t think they were able to fully realize a powerhouse performance—they shared one. Had either actress solely portrayed the title character, the performance would have likely emerged as comparable to Cecilia Roth’s in All About My Mother. Speaking of performances, I want to note Rossy de Palma’s performance in this film: she amazingly “frumped” it up!

Clothes, wallpaper and furniture continue to play an integral part in Almodóvar’s films. Starting with Live Flesh, architecture has also played a major part in Almodóvar’s storytelling and is most evident in Julieta. The contrasts between urban and rural, wealthy and lower middle class are greatly explored though architecture.

Most notably, the film explored several thought-provoking questions:

  • Are we doomed to make the same mistakes our parents made?
  • Can we break the cycle of mistakes?
  • When is it okay to move on from a relationship that has ended because of a death or illness?
  • Does the physical proximity of family contribute to your mental health in a positive or negative way?

The final moments of Julieta actually address many of these questions in terms of the title character, but you may find yourself asking these of your own life. I think this is what makes the film great: it forces introspection and that is what stays with you.

 

Halloween Movie Picks 2016

Halloween Movie Picks 2016

I love Halloween. One of my favorite things to do is to load up on the horror and thriller films. Detailed below are my recommendations currently available on various streaming services. The films here are certainly not mainstream and, by and large, foreign. Let me know if you have seen any of these. Let me know if see any based on my recommendations. I would love to hear your thoughts.

On NETFLIX:

Rabid Dogs: A new French favorite of mine. The ending was so unexpected that the following day I watched it again to see what clues I may have missed. Rabid Dogs has my highest recommendation of all the films on this list. A must watch. There is even a rendition of my favorite Radiohead song “Creep” in the soundtrack.

High Lane: This is a French film and pretty intense. If you can take it…you have been warned…seriously.

Horde: A French zombie film, which I think may have inspired the visual feel of the hit television series, The Walking Dead.

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night: I thought the vampire genre was done until I saw this Persian language film. I loved the direction and cinematography of this one; a truly unique film.

Dark Was The Night: Mysterious creature thriller starring Kevin Durand from The Strain television series. This has some great moments of suspense.

Odd Thomas: This is much lighter than most of the other films on this list. I loved that it was filmed in and around Santa Fe, New Mexico. It stars the late Anton Yelchin of the contemporary Star Trek films.

On HULU:

The Barrens: Is the Jersey Devil real? Stars Stephen Moyer from the True Blood television series.

The Descent: Cave exploration, claustrophobia and something unexpected. Highly recommend this one, but quite intense.

High Tension: Insanely intense French horror film with a surprise ending. Perhaps the most tense of all the films on this list.

Horror Express: A Spanish English language film from the early 1970s that stars Christopher Lee as an archeologist who makes a horrifying discovery. It reminds me of something I would have seen on Chiller Theater via WPIX in New York City.

Psycho Beach Party: The crashing of genres: a spoof of the horror and beach films of the 1960s. This one is a lot of fun.

Them: Another supremely intense French film. This one is based on a true story.

On FILM MOVEMENT:

Wolves in the Snow: A French Canadian film about a woman who kills her husband only to find out that he has ties with the criminal underworld and now they are after her.

Remarkably, Amazon Prime did not have any films I would recommend.

A Middle-Aged Fanboy Reviews Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice

My love affair with comics began in the late 1970s with the television series Wonder Woman: it was because of Lynda Carter that I picked up a comic book! I remember the first issue I ever read where Wonder Woman said things like, “Great Hera” and “Merciful Minerva.” This intrigued me because I was learning about Greek mythology in school. I became enamored with all things Greco-Roman and read Wonder Woman to find the connections in the architecture of Paradise Island (I had already looked up the Greek column orders in the encyclopedia) or the Greek Gods and Goddesses the Amazons worshiped (I remember noting an inconsistency with regards to how she would sometimes use the Roman names for Greek Gods and vice-versa).

About one year after I started watching Wonder Woman, the now classic Superman: The Movie came out and it cemented my bond with comic books: I can still recall the joy and excitement I felt watching that film in the Valentine Theater on Fordham Road. I then started to regularly read Action Comics, All Star Squadron, Detective Comics, Justice League, Teen Titans and, of course, Wonder Woman. I also became a life long fan of artists like Jerry Ordway and George Perez.

I stopped reading comics when I started college in 1985 because I couldn’t afford the time or the money. I did, of course, see films and television shows based on my favorite comic book heroes. I started to read comics again because of Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy and DC’s 2011 reboot of all their titles and characters known as The New 52. Some recommended reading from the New 52 includes the first 24 issues of Batwoman (the artwork of J.H. Williams III is nothing short of thrilling), Earth 2, Gail Simone’s run on Batgirl, Batman (the Court of the Owls story line) and Justice League. Another great read is the graphic novel Superman: Earth One, which clearly had a major influence on 2013’s Man of Steel.

Man of Steel was a good film, but it wasn’t great. I am not sure if it will age as well as the Dark Knight films. I liked the origin story, the portrayal of Krypton and Henry Cavill in the title role, but I agree with critics regarding the over-the-top, Michael Bay destruction of Smallville and Metropolis. Interestingly, this is exactly where Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice starts. (Note: if you have not seen Man of Steel, and intend on seeing Batman v. Superman, you must see the former to understand plot elements of the latter.)

The opening moments of Batman v. Superman recounts Superman’s battle with Zod from the street level. These scenes are quite haunting and bring some much-needed humanity to those over-the-top battle scenes from Man of Steel while effectively setting up the animosity that Batman harbors toward Superman for most of the film. What follows is a relatively action-free hour that explores the film’s central theme: can absolute power (Superman) be trusted? Director Zak Snyder also lightly touches on other themes like media manipulation, money in politics and journalistic responsibility.

Snyder excels with the superhero, comic book come-to-life imagery (as he brilliantly did with Watchmen). He clearly took images and ideas from the pages of the comics that those who don’t read comics may not recognize (see below). However, he does it at the expense of the film’s pacing. There are also too many plot elements and plot holes, which CinemaSins is going to have a real feast with. Some of the biggest plot holes stem from character motivation. I also think it was a mistake to reveal the Doomsday character in the trailers; his reveal in the film would have been a great moment for the collective audience experience.

batmancomparision

From the film and from the graphic novel, Damian: Son of Batman

supermancomparision

From the film and from the graphic novel, Superman: Earth One

Casting was outstanding. Ben Affleck does an excellent job playing Bruce Wayne and Batman. Affleck’s physique in this film is impressive–he is a walking wall of muscle! Also, watching him use all of the Batman gadgets was a lot of fun. Gal Gadot, who plays Diana Prince / Wonder Woman is a revelation—even when she is not in costume as Wonder Woman, she commands your attention! I overheard a lot of chatter from fellow audience members afterward and everyone loved her portrayal. One of my favorite moments in the film was when Wonder Woman used her golden lasso—it beautifully glowed as it does in the comics! I am really looking forward to the Wonder Woman film next year!

gal-gadot-wonder-woman-lasso-batman-vs-superman

Batman v. Superman is fantastic visually and the action scenes are engaging, but overall the film is not as thoughtful as it could have been. For the upcoming Justice League films, Snyder needs to reel in the action a bit and give the audience more credit for being able to think. After all, Comic book fans are quite thoughtful and imaginative.

mewwshirt

I wore my George Perez, Wonder Woman t-shirt to see Batman v. Superman!

Godzilla Thoughtfully

Godzilla

I am a die-hard, life long fan of Godzilla. As a child, growing up in New York City during the 1970’s, I tuned in every time WWOR / Channel 9 had their awesome “Monster Week” movie marathons (check out this terrific YouTube video of an actual WWOR advertisement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOZciXXbSCo from that era). As I got older, WWOR seemed to undergo changes and played those films less frequently.

By the mid-1980’s, Godzilla had been absent from my life and imagination when, during my freshman year at John Jay College, Godzilla 1985 was released. Godzilla ‘85 was a direct sequel to the original (American) version starring Raymond Burr, which ignored the subsequent films of the 1960’s and 1970’s (with Burr reviving his role). With the advent of the VCR, I was able to rent and sometimes buy my favorite Godzilla films. Since 1985, Godzilla has remained a constant part of my life, imagination and sometimes, my art.

My initial attraction to Godzilla was purely visual: as a child, I often imagined what it would be like to see Godzilla walking by my window, or to see him in the distance wreaking havoc on upper Manhattan. Later I saw the deeper meanings and themes that were explored, particularly in the first (Japanese) version. The most typical was Godzilla as the physical manifestation of fears stemming from humanities’ ability to literally destroy the planet. His origins are in the early atomic age. Sixty years later, one has to ask: has humanity learned anything? That is the deeper question being asked by the current American-produced version of Godzilla. We have seen the disasters created by the folly of man, yet we have done little to address and prevent them.

The most thoughtful aspect of Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla is the exploration of humanity and disaster, whether by man or nature. Edwards reminds us of recent disasters including the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. He also reminds us of the human toll these disasters have and how they can sometimes be prevented. Why are we still using nuclear power when technologies to harness the power of the sun and wind have been developed? Humanity has to live in harmony with the planet and not destroy it or we will pay the consequences ( As seen in the New York Times earlier this week: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/13/science/earth/collapse-of-parts-of-west-antarctica-ice-sheet-has-begun-scientists-say.html?action=click&module=Search&region=searchResults&mabReward=relbias%3Ar&url=http%3A%2F%2Fquery.nytimes.com%2Fsearch%2Fsitesearch%2F%3Faction%3Dclick%26region%3DMasthead%26pgtype%3DHomepage%26module%3DSearchSubmit%26contentCollection%3DHomepage%26t%3Dqry319%23%2Focean%2520levels&_r=0 ). In this, Edwards is in step with Godzilla’s tradition of exploring contemporary fears.

Many have already grumbled that title character doesn’t make an appearance until nearly the end of the first hour and is then not given as much screen time as he should have. As in the very first film, Edwards holds Godzilla back for some time. The protracted build up may not agree with a contemporary audiences’ appetite for quick storytelling and non-stop action, BUT once the monsters get going, it is truly something to see. Edwards is a filmmaker in the tradition of Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, NOT Michael Bay or Roland Emmerich (the director of the disastrous–no pun intended—1998 Godzilla wannabe). Godzilla is a beautifully crafted science fiction film in the tradition of Jaws, Jurassic Park and Aliens. Like those films, Godzilla deserves multiple viewings and a sequel (helmed by Edwards). I predict that this film will age well.

Godzilla

Directed by Gareth Edwards

Written by Max Borenstein, based on the character “Godzilla,” owned and created by Toho Company Ltd., and a story by David Callaham

Director of photography, Seamus McGarvey

Edited by Bob Ducsay

Music by Alexandre Desplat

Production design by Owen Paterson

Visual-effects supervisor, Jim Rygiel

Costumes by Sharen Davis

Produced by Thomas Tull, Jon Jashni, Mary Parent and Brian Rogers

Released by Warner Bros. Pictures.

Running time: 2 hours 3 minutes.

 

STARRING: Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Ford Brody), Ken Watanabe (Dr. Ishiro Serizawa), Elizabeth Olsen (Elle Brody), Juliette Binoche (Sandra Brody), Sally Hawkins (Graham), David Strathairn (Adm. William Stenz) and Bryan Cranston (Joe Brody).